Body and Mind

Treating Anxiety

Are you mentally and physically exhausted, consumed with worry to the point that it interferes with every aspect of your life? If so, you are suffering some form of anxiety. When you are caught in the vice-like grip of anxiety, it can be nearly impossible to imagine ever being free. Fortunately, however, anxiety can be effectively treated. For the vast majority of patients, their quality of life improves dramatically. Read on for treatment options for various forms of anxiety.   Treating Generalised Anxiety – There is a plethora of ways to treat Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD); so choose one (or a combination) which suits you.   Changing thought patterns – When you worry, you engage in negative self-talk about trying circumstances. While you may think worrying is preparing you to face the worst-case scenario, more often than not, it is unproductive. Once you give up the idea that worrying is helpful, you can challenge these irrational fears and learn to accept that life has uncertainties.   Connect with others – GAD often leaves you feeling powerless and alone. However, the more connected you are, the less vulnerable you’ll feel. Building a strong support system will dramatically improve your physical and emotional health while providing confidence that someone will always be there for you.   Self-management techniques like these are sufficient for most GAD sufferers. However, if you still feel overburdened, seek professional help.   Treating Hereditary Anxiety – According to common belief, hereditary traits and problems are hardwired and therefore, can’t be fixed. Fortunately, this is not the case for hereditary anxiety. Traditional anxiety treatments, such as medication, cognitive behavioural therapy and self-care techniques are just as effective in treating hereditary anxiety.   Treating Organic […]

By |Wednesday, August 12, 2015|Anxiety, General, Wellness| Comments

Midyear Review and Evaluation

  It’s the middle of the year and time for a mid-year review. We spend time reviewing our finances and businesses at this time of year, with the end of the Australian financial year. However, it should also be a time for you to review your health and well being.   Are you where you want to be? Is your health the best it can be? For many of us, we go through the days, weeks and years on auto pilot without taking the time to stop and evaluate. Well, we’re advising that you do, and here are some tools to help ensure you are well-rested and relaxed.   SLEEP Getting a good night’s sleep can cure all kinds of issues so is a definite must. Take note that a satisfying sleep is not about how long you spend in bed, but rather about the quality of sleep that you get.   AVOID STRESS It sounds obvious, but try to avoid anything that causes you stress. For instance, if you have a long to do list, then go through one thing at a time. If somebody adds to your ‘list’, then let them know you will help as soon as you are done. Remember, you can never please everybody, and trying to do so will only put undue stress and pressure on yourself. If it can’t be avoided, practice delegation that will help relieve you of some stress, and also ensure the job gets done.   REST Third, be sure to rest your brain now and then. The human brain can only process so much information at any given time, and when overloaded, it tends to decrease in function.   Mental exhaustion is common in […]

By |Thursday, July 2, 2015|General, Wellness| Comments

The Psychological Benefits of Running

Unlike other forms of exercise, running is a marginalising activity – the truly passionate are pounding the pavement before sunrise while others avoid it at all costs. Whether you consider it an effective aerobic workout or an exhausting chore, you can’t deny its positive effect on the body and mind.   Some run purely for the physical benefits – it burns calories faster than the same time spent walking or cycling. For some, however, the psychological benefits may outweigh the physical ones.   Though deceptively simple to learn, regular running has a positive impact on the entire body. For instance, incorporating running into your routine will lower your blood pressure by maintaining the elasticity of the arteries.   The rigorous physical activity also maximises lung capacity. Frequent deep breathing while running forces the lungs to use more tissue, so up to 50% of the otherwise unused lung potential is utilised. Even long-term smokers may increase their lung potential through running.   Running also strengthens the heart, helping to prevent heart attacks. Running is large muscle exercise. This means it keeps the cardiovascular system efficient and strong, while opening the arteries, allowing blood to flow smoothly.   In addition to the physical benefits, running has a positive impact on your emotional and mental health. Running is often suggested by doctors to treat clinical depression and associated psychological disorders. Doctors who treat clinically depressed patients now believe that the physical activity is as effective as psychotherapy. It can decrease tension, depression, fatigue and confusion associated with mental illnesses   The reason behind this is that more endorphins are released into the body and also running can give patients something else to focus their energy on. It provides […]

How To Avoid Burnout

Are you constantly looking toward the next deadline? Do you have trouble saying ‘no’ and continually find yourself over committed? If so, you may be suffering from burnout. Burnout can turn even the most routine of problems into a seemingly insurmountable mountain. This state of mind causes havoc with relationships, work and health. However, with the right motivation and coping strategies, burnout can become a thing of the past.   The term “burnout” was coined by Hebert Freudenberger, in his 1974 novel Staff Burnout. Burnout is a work-specific syndrome, which is becoming commonplace with constant workplace changes. Burnout is mental and physical exhaustion caused by excessive, prolonged stress. It occurs when you feel overwhelmed and unable to meet constant demands. Burnout reduces productivity and steals energy, leaving you feeling hopeless, cynical and resentful. Eventually, you feel you have nothing left to give.   The adverse effect of burnout spills out into every area of life – home and social life. Burnout causes long-term bodily changes, making you vulnerable to infections (e.g. colds). The primary causes of burnout include: feeling one has no control over one’s work, lack of recognition and unclear, overly demanding expectations. The condition is supplemented by lifestyle and personality outside of the workplace. Factors include:   Lack of sleep Absence of close/personal relationships High expectations from too many people Working to the point of having no relaxation or social life A pessimistic outlook While burnout sounds a lot like stress, they are entirely different issues. Stress is characterised by over-engagement while burnout is characterised by disengagement. Burnout produces helplessness, a loss of motivation, ideas and hope.   By adopting the right coping strategies, you can significantly lessen the impact of burnout on […]

Anger Management

Anger is an intense emotional response experienced when personal boundaries are violated. Renowned anger management writer William DeFoore describes anger as a “pressure cooker” which pressure can only be applied against briefly before it explodes. The most common manifestation of anger is in facial expressions and body language however it also has behavioural and cognitive components. However, these behaviours are entirely under an individual’s control. By applying the following tips, you will learn how to manage your anger, so the situation does not escalate.   Think before you speak: Although it is easy to say and much harder to do, this is one of the best ways to avoid a meltdown. During an argument, we often say things we do not mean and later regret. By thinking before you speak, you can articulate your feelings more effectively and often get the required results.   Once calm, express your feelings: When you’re thinking clearly, express your needs and frustration in a productive and assertive way. Explain your concerns to the other party without hurting their feelings or trying to manipulate them. Expressing your feelings promotes open discussion, allowing all involved to have their feelings heard.   Take a timeout: Timeouts can be just as useful for adults as kids. Taking short breaks during stressful times of day will keep you calm and focused. A few moments of quiet reflection will help organise your thoughts, ensuring you are less likely to feel angry or frustrated.   Identify possible solutions: Rather than concentrating on what made you upset, try to solve the issue at hand. In other words, by locating and dealing with the source of the problem, it will no longer be a source of angst for […]

By |Tuesday, March 24, 2015|General| Comments